Interesting things happen when you’re live. People go off-script, improvise, say and do unexpected things or just feel more spontaneous and direct. Sports is more exciting live. Comedy in front of a live studio audience is funnier. Live news is more breaking and live politics is more raw. Live music is more powerful.

That’s why it’s great that from April 1 until June 30, 2016, .live is on sale for $15.57 per year (normally $31.15 at A rates).

A .live domain also goes well with .rocks and .social, which are two other TLDs on sale since January. That was supposed to end March 31, but that’s now been extended to June 30.

Register a domain under one of these TLDs?:

.tld

Greetings, intrepid domain name adventurer! This month in our ongoing infographic series we travel through time and space to a land of magic and mystery, in which previously only the brave have dared venture.

We are here to guide you on your quest through the unforgiving territory between registrars: the no man’s land of domain name transfers.

Before we begin, remember, in this land, the registry is king. The route we’ve mapped is valid in most kingdoms, that is, most generic TLDs (.com, .net, etc.).

However, the laws of the land can vary, depending on the registry.

The journey between the losing registrar and the gaining registrar has four verifications

As in any quest, it’s foolhardy to leave your home castle without being properly prepared for the road ahead. For us, that means unlocking your domain by removing the transfer protection status, and obtaining the authorization code (the Auth code) from your registrar.

Get your domain unlocked from the losing registrar and ask for your authorization code

Once you have properly prepared, launch your volley to the gaining registrar. If that’s Gandi, that means placing the order to transfer your domain.

Next, you will face four challenges, represented here by four towers along the road to transfer.

First is the Auth code verification challenge. If your key, which you obtained from your losing registrar, matches the one from the registry, you may proceed. If not, you are thrown in the dungeon. Well, not really, you just won’t be able to transfer your domain.

Next, you come to a moat which can only be crossed if the drawbridge is lowered. To lower the drawbridge, your domain must be “unlocked.

In other words, it must not have either a clientTransferProhibited or serverTransferProhibited status. Otherwise, you will be fed to the moat monsters. And by that we mean you’ll get an error message.

The gaining registrar checks the authorization code and the domain status

The next tower you come to is home to two little birdies. These carry messages to the registrant email address listed in the whois (either the Owner address or the Admin address provided by your previous registrar) and to the email address provided to your new registrar.

Only when the transfer is confirmed by following the link in both emails (that is, only when both birds fly home) can you proceed. Otherwise, in the words of a great meme wizard: “You. Shall. Not. Pass!”

Emails to the address in the whois and the one provided must be confirmed

At last, at the final tower, a flag is raised notifying the losing registrar of the transfer. This comes in the form of a message sent by the registry. This is the last chance the losing registrar has to prevent the transfer, which they can and should do if appropriate. Generally, this would be in cases of fraud, theft, etc.

A positive confirmation from the registrar allows you to proceed on your quest immediately. Otherwise, if no word comes from the previous registrar within five days, you may also proceed.

If the losing registrar accepts or if five days pass the transfer goes through

After that, congratulations! You’ve made it! Your domain is transferred.

A few other notes: you may want to prepare things at your new registrar a bit before launching the transfer. This includes configuring your DNS settings and even setting up email, hosting, etc.

Also, we would be remiss not to mention, that however arduous the journey, you are never alone when seeking to transfer your domain. If your quest seems too daunting and too dangerous, our Customer Care knights are available for guidance along the way and/or dragon slaying (when applicable). You can reach them using our online contact form.

Finally, for detailed instructions, our sage scribes have compiled a complete guide to domain name transfers in our wiki.


The amazing explosion in modern computing, networking, and cryptography in the past eighty some years all grew out of collaborations between the miltary, academia, and ocassionally business contractors. As the three fields blossomed into new technology that would change the way humanity connects, it created friction between those in the military establishment who wanted to limit these fields to the security interests they represent and those who saw the potential for such technical advances to be used for lofty goals like human rights.

When Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman published “New Directions in Cryptography” in 1976, they noted in the introduction that computer communication would soon be connecting people around the world and that communication between individuals—not militaries or financial institutions—would need to be made secure.

This was their preamble to their solution to the age-old cryptographic riddle of secure distribution of ciphers. The system they went on to describe enables two people who have never met face-to-face to communicate with one another without third-parties listening.

They proposed using mathematical functions to create pairs of keys: one public, one private. A publicly visible key would be used to encrypt a message that only a privately-held key could decrypt.

Diffie and Hellman solved the problem of key exchange, but they left open the problem of implementing it using a one-way function.

This problem intrigued three researchers at MIT: Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir and Leonard Adleman.

They spent nearly a year trying to find a solution. Then, in April 1977, the trio spent Passover together, drinking wine and talking. That night Rivest developed a bad case of insomnia.

So he spent the night formalizing what would became the RSA algorithm, named for Rivest, Shamir and Adleman. After the trio verified and refined the system they’d invented, they published it in August 1977 and filed a patent through MIT in December.

Their patent became the basis of RSA Security, the company founded in 1982 by Rivest, Shamir and Adleman to market implementations of their RSA algorithm.

These developments, though, were not exactly welcomed by the military establishment. Cryptographic tools have long figured on the U.S. Munitions List and as early as July 1977, the NSA started signaling that they felt threatened by private developments in cryptography like public-key encryption and RSA.

Meanwhile, the 1980s brought computers and networking out of government and university laboratories and into homes and offices.

A bill in the House of Representatives which would have restricted public use of cryptography prompted Phil Zimmerman, an anti-nuclear protestor in Colorado, to start what he would later call a “human rights project,”: to apply public-key encryption to email communication.

Zimmerman thought the RSA algorithm was just be used for what he called “petri dish cryptography.” So he “borrowed” it to create a scrambling function he named Bass-O-Matic after an SNL skit.

Then in June 1991 he released “Pretty Good Privacy” or PGP version 1 which used the Bass-O-Matic function to encrypt emails.

In the documentation, Zimmerman wrote: “it would be nice if everyone routinely used encryption for all their e-mail, innocent or not, so that no one drew suspicion by asserting their e-mail privacy with encryption,” describing encryption as a “form of solidarity.”

Mere hours after posting it online, PGP went global.

Soon its distribution on the Internet got Zimmerman into trouble, both with US Customs and with RSA Security.

In the first case, because PGP was distributed outside of the US, posting PGP online made Zimmerman guilty of arms trafficking.

His solution to the first problem was unique: print the PGP source code in a hardcopy book through MIT Press, then sell and distribute it with First Amendment protection.

People who wanted a copy of PGP could buy the book, take out the pages and scan them in (or type it by hand).

It wasn’t until later that US courts would extend first amendment protection to all software source code but the US Customs case was eventually dropped.

In the second case, Zimmerman’s use of RSA violated RSA’s patent protection.

This proved harder to beat. PGP 3 abandoned RSA for the unpatented DSA and ElGamal algorithms.

The new PGP Inc. then merged with Viacrypt, who had an RSA license, but patent issues plagued PGP through multiple acquisitions.

In the meantime, another technology was being developed by Netscape using RSA.

Netscape’s case was a different problem than email encryption.

PGP is an application level solution. Netscape needed to provide Transport (or Socket) layer security. The solution that Netscape engineers developed was called Secure Socket Layer or SSL.

Version 1, never made it outside of Netscape. Version 2 was released in 1995 but due to serious security flaws, Netscape began working on version 3.

Netscape engineers Phil Karlton and Alan Freier worked with cryptographer Paul Kocher. While Kocher was a biology major at Stanford, he worked part-time with none other than Martin Hellman. The three soon released SSL version 3.

In 1997, Zimmerman took PGP to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) to propose an OpenPGP standard.

Today, the patent on the RSA algorithm has been released and OpenPGP is an official internet standard.

The SSL protocol proposed as an Internet Standard in 1999 and renamed TLS.

Diffie and Hellman’s predictions about the future of networking played out and their revolutionary discovery inspired RSA. The raw potential of this discovery was enough to make the military powers-that-be nervous.

Yet, Phil Zimmerman’s desire to encrypt all email “in solidarity” still hasn’t come about. TLS-level security far outstrips email encryption in terms of adoption but TLS/SSL is far from universal.

Public key encryption continues to be an invaluable human rights tool. The battle between encryption-for-all and the more narrow interests of law enforcement and the military continue to make headlines. Encryption is far from universal and the conflict is far from resolved.


SUMMARY: AT A GLANCE
---------------------------------------------------------------

1. Pay for orders automatically at Gandi
2. Recently-delegated TLDs
3. Gandi events
4. Visualization: Domain name transfer procedure PLUS Transfer price updates!
5. In-depth: More about slamming emails
6. Tech Fundamentals: Public key encryption
7. TLD release calendar
8. Promo roundup

---------------------------------------------------------------

It’s May, which means it’s now full-on springtime in the northern hemisphere. Nature seems like one big information processing system, where the input of so many little packets of code is transmuted into the beautiful output of green sprouts and buds and flowers and debugging is taken literally. Maybe it just means we need to step away from our keyboards more often, but it has us thinking about transformation.

This month, North American customers can now enter their credit or debit card in our payment system to be charged when an order paid through the prepaid account (such as an automatic renewal) is placed. Likewise, we’re also looking at the latest TLDs to be transformed from application to an actual extension in our Recently Delegated TLDs update.

This month we also recap the launch of our The Root Zone. meetup series and look forward to observing some interesting transformations first-hand at the Bay Area Maker Faire, all in our Events section.

Then, we visualize the domain name transfer process. Going In Depth, we launch a more expansive look into slamming email scams and briefly explore the history of Public Key Encryption in this month’s Tech Fundamentals. Finally, of course, we end with a look at TLD releases and current and ongoing promos.

 

Pay for orders automatically at Gandi
---------------------------------------------------------------

It’s been a long time coming, but as of Monday May 9, North American customers can now add credit cards to automatically credit their prepaid accounts. This is welcome news to anyone using our automatic renewal service on any of our products as it’s now possible to add a credit or debit card that we will automatically charge the amount due for an automatically-launched order.

Gandi Prepaid Credit Page

Set up automatic payment from the Prepaid account page under the Billing tab of your account


Read our full announcement | Back to top

Recently-Delegated TLDs
---------------------------------------------------------------

In the past 30 days or so, plenty of new generic TLD applications have come to ultimate fruition by being added to the root zone.

.baby .talk .abudhabi

The list includes a couple of TLDs that may have been the subject of some wheeling and dealing behind the scenes were delegated to the root, as well as an unexpectedly controversial TLD and more.

Which strings were delegated | Back to top

Gandi Events
---------------------------------------------------------------

After much preparation and planning along with Cloudflare, this past month we launched our new The Root Zone. meetup series.

The Root Zone. w/ Dan Kaminsky, May 10, 2016

The second edition taking place just the other day on May 10th. Also this month, we'll be headed to Bay Area Maker Faire for the day on May 20th


Read all event details | Back to top

Visualization: Domain name transfer procedure
---------------------------------------------------------------

This month, we planted the seeds of our expertise in all matters domain-related, and put together a visualization that blossomed into quite a neat little project. We have to admit we had some fun with it. This time around, we looked at the procedure for transferring a domain name between registrars (with special attention to the process to transfer in to Gandi, of course).

The result was a visual guide to a quest fraught with peril: transferring your domain name.

The journey between the losing registrar and the gaining registrar has four verifications

Transfer Quest: Coming to a registrar near you

And, we're happy to announce that to help motivate you along your journey, we have some transfer pricing updates to announce.

Now you can transfer your .com, .info, .net, and .org domains. Now, .com transfers are $8.83, .info transfers are $9.87, .net transfers are $9.23 and .org transfers are $9.96. Happy transfering!

Begin your quest | Back to top

In-depth: More about slamming emails
---------------------------------------------------------------

Last month, we provided a guide on how to spot a slamming email. That launched us into a more expansive look at domain slamming in general, the different forms it comes in, and some additional tips for staying safe out there.

Find out more about slamming | Back to top

Tech Fundamentals: Public key encryption
---------------------------------------------------------------

From the start, public key cryptography was seen as needed by all and a challenge to military authority.

Tech Fundamentals

From Diffie and Hellman through Rivest, Shamir and Adleman, Phil Zimmerman's landmark PGP, we looked at public key cryptography’s flourishing as an invaluable human rights tool and look to the future fruits we hope to see it bear in this month’s Tech Fundamentals.

Read our history of public key encryption | Back to top

TLD release Calendar
---------------------------------------------------------------

Here's a look at TLD releases at Gandi for the month of May 2016:

Tuesday May 3:

.mom (GoLive)

.game (Sunrise)

Monday May 9:

.insurance (Sunrise)

Tuesday May 10:

.ist (GoLive)

.istanbul (GoLive)

Monday May 17:

.vip (GoLive)

.promo (Landrush)

Monday May 23:

.promo (GoLive)

Tuesday May 24:

.game (Landrush and GoLive)

Thursday May 26:

.autos (Landrush )

Stay tuned for updates and, of course, for next month's releases.

Back to top

Promo Roundup
---------------------------------------------------------------

There are plenty of opportunities this month to plant the seeds to be reaped later by taking advantage of new and ongoing promos:

Starting May 1:

.green $47.65 (50% off) per year through June 30

.xyz $2.00 per year through May 30

.me $4.00 per year through May 14

.family $8.00 per year through June 30

.design $31.18   per year (50% off) through June 15

.tech $4.99 per year through May 31

Starting May 3:

.press $5.00 per year through June 3

Starting May 9:

.mx $24.00  per year (50% off) through May 31

Ongoing promotions:

.earth $15.56 per year (50% off) through May 31

.stream $2.00 per year in GoLive

.live $15.57 per year through June 30

.accountant, .bid, .cricket, .date, .download, .faith, .loan, .party, .racing, .review, .science, .trade, .webcam, .win $2.00 per year through December 31

.boutique, .immo, .maison, .sarl, .voyage $10.00 through June 30

.me $14.40 through December 31

.in $7.75 through June 30

.rocks $7.75 and .social $16.25 through May 31

.link $4.21 and .click $3.62 through June 30

.adult, .porn, .sex, .xxx $12.00 through May 31

.co.com $19.99 through May 31

And in addition to these great promos, a few TLDs have upcoming birthdays. To celebrate, we're lowering the price for you to transfer them in to Gandi from now until one month after their birthdays. Here are the TLDs, with their birthdays listed and the limited-time transfer price:

.ninja, May 28, transfers now $13.40 (normally $17.54)

.xyz, June 2, transfers now $9.00 (normally $11.55)

.social, June 4, transfers now $22.20 (normally $29.06)

Happy birthday all you lucky TLDs.

Back to top

 

Well, that's all the output we have this month. Do you have any input for us? Tweet us @gandibar, email us at feedback@gandi.net, on Facebook, G+, or on the #gandi channel on Freenode. \o/

Otherwise, until next time.

 

Sincerely,

Gandi.net


.ist this it? Yes! Today, May 10, 2016 is the day .ist AND .istanbul enter the GoLive phase.

Pre-orders in this phase are being submitted and now, you can get any .ist or .istanbul domain still available for just $23.33 per year at A rates for .ist and $29.07 per year for .istanbul.

Both of these extensions are for the great and ancient city of Istanbul, but are open to anyone.

This .ist (and .istanbul) what you’ve always wanted, .istn't it?

Register a domain under one of these TLDs?:

.tld

Here's a look at upcoming, ongoing and past events at Gandi.

 

The Root Zone.

Last month, Gandi and Cloudflare presented the first in our joint series The Root Zone. (yes, the dot IS important). In this series, we are talking with some of the great names in DNS.

A big thank you, first of all, goes out to Paul Mockapetris for being our first guest as well as another thank you to Cloudflare for teaming up with us on this series, including providing space for hosting last time.

If you missed it, don't fret, we have two pieces of good news for you. The talk is available on YouTube, courtesy of Cloudflare:

En plus, you can come to this month’s meetup, which will feature Dan Kaminsky!. Those of you unfamiliar with Dan, he discovered his namesake vulnerability in DNS: the Kaminsky Vulnerability.

The Kaminsky Vulnerability allowed attackers to perform cache poisoning. Essentially, a bad actor could respond to a legitimate DNS query and it would look like an authoritative answer and then propagate to all child DNS servers using the same cache, until the TTL was up.

The Root Zone. w/ Dan Kaminsky, May 10, 2016

Ask all your questions and find out more by coming to this month’s The Root Zone., hosted in our San Francisco offices this month on Tuesday, May 10, 2016 at 6:00 PM PDT.

Keep an eye on the meetup page for more information and updates.

UX Speed Dating: User Testing Night

The third Wednesday of each month, Gandi hosts UX Speed Dating, a meetup for user-experience enthusiasts, whether currently committed to a development cycle or not, can have a fling with another user experience. And by that we mean test it and provide feedback.

Check out the specific rules and see the Meetup page or the UX Speed dating site for details.

Bay Area Maker Faire

Gandi will be at Maker Faire this month. We won’t have a booth but we will be wandering the floor of Maker Faire in San Mateo May 20.

If you’re not familiar with Maker Faire, you’re probably wondering: what’s Maker Faire and what makes a maker? Makers are tinkerers, engineers, artists, teachers, crafters, writers, students and more all focused on, well, making things. It’s DIY on all levels. A Maker Faire is a showcase of everything that all these various types of people have made and learned.

This is a movement we really feel we can get behind. We try to provide our products as a platform for this kind of tinkering, so we’re excited to be attending this year. We’ll be around on Friday (tweet @gandibar if you’re interested in meeting up), but otherwise, the Faire goes on all weekend, so stop by if you get a chance. And who knows, maybe next year Gandi will have a bigger role to play …


You may be aware that we recently celebrated a day of some significance to Mexican history. Of course, we’re talking about Cinco de Mayo, the birthday of the last Mexican governor of California, Pío Pico, born May 5, 1801.*

If only Pío Pico had also been in some way instrumental in the post office, then we would have a perfect deal for him: all the rest of this month from May 9 through May 31, 2016, .mx domains the official TLD of Mexico (but also the technical abbreviation for “mailbox”) will be available for half-price. That’s $24.00 per year instead of the usual $48.00 per year at A rates.

Register a .mx?

.mx

 

* What's all this about the Battle of Puebla?


Customers in the US and Canada with their domains or hosting set to auto-renew are probably aware that they need to have a sufficient balance on their prepaid accounts in order for an automatic renewal to go through.

This meant either paying for the renewal long ahead of time by crediting your prepaid account at the same time as setting up the automatic renewal, or having to log in and add money to your prepaid account when your service came up for renewal anyway.

If this state of affairs has left you puzzling over what the whole point of automatic renewal was anyway, then we have good news for you.

As of Monday May 9, 2016, Gandi customers in North America may now set up a credit or debit card* to be automatically charged when their prepaid account is depleted.

That means you can now be charged on your card for an automatic renewal without having to log in again.

To take advantage of this feature, you need to have 3D Secure (also called “Verified by Visa” or “MasterCard SecureCode”) set up on your card. Then you can add your card from the Billing tab under your Prepaid Account (click to the “Credit” page).

Gandi Prepaid Credit Page

When you click “Add a card,” you’ll be asked to fill out some information and set the amount to debit, under what conditions.

Gandi Automatic Debit Settings Page

There will be a $1.00 test charge on your card and after that, you’re ready activate the card and charge everything straight to your prepaid account (don’t let it go to your head, though).

For more information on adding* a credit card to your Gandi account, see our wiki page on the subject.

You can, of course, still do things the old-fashioned way. Check out our other payment methods too.

And if you have any problems or any other questions, feel free to contact our Customer care team.

 

* Gandi does not store credit card information. Your card will be stored on file directly with our bank.


If you are the happy holder of a domain name or of a trademark, you might have received messages which look suspicious or seem to originate from dubious senders. One will, for instance, pretend your domain name is about to expire, but is not sent by the sponsoring Registrar. The other contacts you in your capacity as CEO and kindly informs you someone is trying to register domain names with Chinese top level tlds using your trademark and/or your company name.

After reading this message, you are left on your own, with many options ranging from ignoring the mail to forwarding the message to your attorney. You may be facing a slamming attempt, a common type of fraud which is perpetrated in various ways.

Last month, we warned our customers about a wave of slamming attempts and this article's goal is to provide an overview of the different frauds that go by the illustrious name  "slamming" and to provide you with advice as to what to do when you receive such messages.

 

1. The "Protect your trademarks" (for a high price) scam

While pretending to offer help protecting your trademarks, a "Registrar" contacts you telling you someone is trying to register these trademarks in Chinese and Asian top-level domains such as .cn, .asia or .tw. This generous sender is simply willing to allow you to oppose these registrations! If you are still interested in protecting your trademarks, of course.

Usually, trademark holders reply instantly: yes please! Block these people trying to steal my business!

The trademark holder just confirmed his order for a domain name registration he did not need in the first place. And it is usually really expensive.

We advise you to: not (ever) reply to these alleged warnings. Replying will confirm you are reading the message and that you're worried about your tradermarks and will be considered by the scammer as a sign of weakness and vulnerablability.

 

2. The "Someone registered your domain name as a keyword" scam

These messages are usually written in an urgent tone. They are very similar to those above, even if they indicate someone registered your trademarks or domain names as keywords instead of domain names.

Again, please disregard these offers: replying will only lead the scammer to put pressure on you and offer overpriced (compared to average) services that you do not even need.


3. The "Your domain name will expire soon" scam

You might have received emails in the past indicating your domain name would expire soon while, to your knowledge, it was due to expire much later.

This type of scam works the same way no matter the perpetrator: you are being told your domain name is about to expire within the next few days and you could lose it. A document is usually attached to facilitate renewal process.

This document is not a real renewal order. By replying and ticking the box or accepting the offer, you are instead accepting a transfer of your domain name from your current Registrar to another.

Not only is your domain name being transferred from your trusted Registrar to an unknown and not-so-trustworthy Registrar (they emailed you out of the blue, remember), but you are also charged four or five times the price usually charged for such transfers.

We advise you to: upon reception of these so-called "reminders", your first reaction should be to perform a Whois check on your domain name to compare the "reminder" information and the Registry's information.

If the expiration date does not match the one the message you received, you are most probably reading a fake notification.

Quick reminder: keep in mind that you can enable the "transfer lock" protection on your domain names directly from your GANDI account as well as two-factor authentication and, at last, IP restriction, to increase the protection level on your domain name(s).

And as we mentioned before, remember our anti-spam protection feature. When this feature is activated, anyone who culls your email address from the whois (as domain slammers often do) will only get a "hashed" version @contact.gandi.net. You can know that emails sent to such an address do not come from Gandi.

If you encounter such a situation our key recommendations are to check the email headers for suspicious addresses and to double check the information provided in those emails (expiration date, domain name holder). This will protect you from mistaking a scam with a legitimate notification. In any case, do not hesitate toreach out to GANDI's customer care teams, they will be glad to help you sort things out and make sure you are dealing with a legitimate reminder.


ImageMagick announced a security vulnerability, registered as CVE-2016-3714, that allows malicious users to craft filenames to execute code remotely.

We have applied the appropriate fixes on Simple Hosting to protect customer applications using ImageMagick libraries.

If you're using ImageMagick in your application, make sure you restart your instance after 18:00 UTC (11:00 AM PDT) on May 4, 2016 in order to apply the patch.

You can restart your instance from the website or from the terminal with Gandi CLI:

$ gandi paas restart {instance_name}

Please don't hesitate to contact Customer Care if you experience any issues or have any questions related to this topic.


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