This month, the new generic TLDs delegated to the root zone seemed to have been TLDs that weathered a bit more contention than in a typical month. Objections were filed for applications for TLDs delegated in June for string confusion, when a TLD is supposedly so close to another that the two could be easily confused, and for legal rights. One applicant for .art even attempted to game the system to favor their application.

.now, .deal, .saveJune 7

July 12 was Amazon Prime Day and only just on June 7, .prime was delegated by ICANN as a Brand TLD but on the same day, Amazon also had some success with generic TLDs with .now, .deal and .save all being delegated on that day.

These were not all totally without controversy, however.

The application for .now was objected to by Starbucks (HK) Limited. This isn’t the coffee company, but the owners of now TV, a pay TV service launched in Hong Kong in 2003. The objection was filed as a Legal Rights Objection. Starbucks claimed that their ownership of the “now” trademark meant that other applicants would be infringing. The same company succeeded in its application for .nowtv, which they have yet to assign a regsitry to, so it seems that they are very concerned about protecting their brand. Perhaps this was an earnest case of trademark protection or perhaps it was an attempt to use the objection process to favor their own bid.

.camJune 16

Verisign filed separate String Confusion objections for each of the three .cam applications submitted, claiming that its proximity to .com would cause confusion. Oddly, the objection to Demand Media’s application prevailed even though the objections to AC Webconnecting Holding B.V.’s application and to Famous Four Media’s application were dismissed.

After appealing the decision, though, Demand Media was able to win against the objection and AC Webconnecting Holding B.V. won .cam in an auction.

.shoppingJune 21

Last month, .shop was delegated to GMO, who wanted it so much they applied for it twice. GMO ultimately prevailed, but another applicant for the .shop TLD, Commercial Connect, tried to protect their application by filing an objection to Donut’s .shopping application.

Interestingly, no objection was filed to Uniregistry’s application and as the only remaining applicant, Uniregistry’s application won.

.artJune 23

The .art TLD was one of the most applied-for new gTLDs in the entire program, with ten initial applications, including two community applications. One of those was from dadotart inc., a subsidiary of DeviantArt evidently created to serve as the registry of .art domains.

DeviantArt’s counsel commented on another application from an applicant who took an unorthodox approach. Aremi Group registered trademarks for .art and dotart in the EU, a way in which certain players have tried to game the TLD release process.

Neither Aremi Group’s or DeviantArt’s application for .art prevailed, though, and after half the registrants withdrew their applications, including Aremi Group, UK Creative Ideas Limited won .art in a private auction.

.politieJune 23

Similar to a Brand TLD, the Dutch national police had their applied-for TLD, .politie, added to the root zone this month as well. The word “politie” is Dutch for “police,” and the Dutch police intend to use it to fight phishing attempts using the name of the Dutch police. Citizens can know, instead, that any communications or information coming from a .politie domain is actually from the police and not someone else. It’s certainly interesting to see a public institution tech-savvy enough to take advantage of the new gTLD program to improve their services to the public they serve.

As always: these are new TLDs on the cutting edge of having been added by ICANN. As such, any discussion of one of these TLDs should not be interpreted as meaning any of these extensions will be imminently available on Gandi (though we, of course, try to offer all the extensions we possibly can).


Devoted followers of the Gandi news feed may recall a couple of months back that the .game TLD has already entered the GoLive phase (after a somewhat tumultuous start). So what are we playing at, then? It's no .game, it's .games.

Just like .auto and .autos, .car and .cars, the plural form of .game.games—is a totally separate TLD. And as of July 12 at 10:00 AM PDT, it’s entering the Sunrise phase, which will last until September 10, 2016. During the Sunrise phase, owners of a TMCH registration will be able to purchase their trademark domain name for $300.62 per year.

Then, from September 18 through 22, .games will be in the Landrush phase. During this phase, domains will be available for $162.60 per year.

Finally, on September 21, 2016 at 10:00 AM PDT, .games will enter the GoLive phase at a price of $23.15 per year at A rates.

Remember: if you want to register in the Landrush or GoLive phases, you can pre-register now and we’ll send your order to the registry as soon as .games enters the corresponding phase.

So quit playing around.

Register your .games:

.games



Funny how all these old-fashioned words find new life online. Who, for example, still has a real, physical inbox on a real physical desk top? When was the last time you used controls located on a real panel? Or looked someone up in a face book?

How about watched a video on a screen that still used a vacuum tube to project an image? Even though this technology is going the way of the dinosaur, the internet has proliferated with tubes of all kinds.

And we can expect even more to come as .tube enters the GoLive phase July 7, 2016 at 7:00 AM PDT you can buy a .tube domain for your own online video (or blog about riding the London subway system) and in the process help revive this old-fashioned word even more for just $38.35 per year at A rates.

Buy a .tube?

.tube


The gTLDs .com and .net, short for “company” and “network”, respectively, are internationally recognized as perhaps the most iconic gTLDs and form the core of the “classic” gTLD set.

While  .公司 (.xn--55qx5d, Chinese for “company”) and .网络 (.xn--io0a7i, Chinese for “network”) officially opened a couple of years ago, we were not able to offer them immediately upon their release.

However, that’s now changed and we are happy to announce that these two TLDs are now available to purchase at Gandi.

Now you can buy a .公司 for $50.74 USD per year at A rates or a .网络 for $50.74 USD per year at A rates, or 1585 TWD (w/t tax) for either, whether it’s just to get in on the burgeoning Chinese-language internet or to translate, so to speak, your .com and .net into Chinese.

These extensions come with a few conditions, though. Notably, if you are registering a domain for your company (which would make sense for a .公司), you must send a copy of your organization’s registration certificate. If you’re registering as an individual, you need to send a legal photo ID. In both cases, the documents you provide have to match the information you put on your Gandi handle exactly. So be precise.

For full details on these rules and how to send these documents to us, please see the following pages:

Register a domain under one of these TLDs?:

.tld

*UPDATED JULY 1 :

We are starting off the year summer right, with a virtual explosion of colorful extensions (and then some) on promotion from now until June 30 December 31, all of them 50% off.

First, here are our deals on as many colors as you can find in a New Year's July Fourth fireworks display:

.black on sale for $28.63 per year (normally $57.25).
.blue on sale for $8.16 per year (normally $16.31).
.pink on sale for $8.16 per year (normally $16.31).
.red on sale for $8.16 per year (normally $16.31).

And bringing all the colors of the rainbow together, we also have a great deal on .lgbt:

.lgbt on sale for $28.63 per year (normally $57.25).

Going one further with diversity, we are also offering deals on

.kim for people and families whose surname is Kim, for $8.16 per year (instead of the usual $16.31)

and

.shiksha, which is for the culture of writing and phonetics of one of six forms of Sanskrit Hindu. Domains in this extension will be available for $8.16 per year (instead of $16.31).

Next, representing at least the black and the red:

.poker is on sale for $28.61 per year (instead of $57.22).

Then there are a couple of TLDs on sale which don't really have a direct relationship to colors and diversity, but are for areas we would certainly hope are diverse:

.pro for professionals is on sale for $10.00 per year (instead of $20.00).
.info for information of course is on sale for $4.97 per year (instead of $9.93).

Finally, rounding out the list are two TLDs that are focused on mobile technology:

.mobi for $9.00 per year instead of the usual $18.00.
.移动 (Chinese for "mobile", punycode .xn-6frz82g) for $8.16 per year rather than the usual $16.31.

 

*And now also: .promo domains are $9.70 per year instead of the usual $19.40.

 

So, how about one last champagne toast can of beer? To good deals on domains in 2016!

Register a domain under one of these TLDs?:

.tld

The doors are open to brand and trademark owners to register a .shop domain in the Sunrise phase today, June 30, 2016 as of 8:00 AM PDT. Domains can be purchased in the Sunrise phase for $1050.74 per year at A rates until August 30, 2016.

Then, for four days only, from September 22 until 26 at 8:00 AM, you have a chance to snatch up a .shop domain for $174.60 in the Landrush phase, and take it off the shelf for possible competition once .shop enters GoLive.

Finally, on September 26, also at 8:00 AM PDT, .shop becomes available to all in the GoLive phase for just $45.95 per year at A rates. Even if you don’t have a trademark registered with TMCH, you can still nonetheless pre-register a domain in the GoLive phase while the Sunrise and Landrush phases are ongoing.

So whether you have a Pop-up or a Mom-and-Pop, now’s the time to get your .shop.

Get a .shop?

.shop


In October 2013, ICANN launched the new generic top-level domains (nTLDs) program. Now, less than three years later, more than a thousand new TLDs have been delegated, 999 of them active.

While it massively increases the online name space and choices for would-be domain name registrants, this preponderance of choices can also be daunting, even threatening. Especially for those concerned with issues of intellectual property and trademark owners, for whom the incredible increase of new TLDs means extra hassle at the least or in the worst case, added budgetary strain, even to the point of unattainably high expense.

At the same time, the standard advice is nonetheless to “defend your territory,” when a new extension has to do with an area of commerce or a type of service that may be associated with your business, and that requires keeping up with new extensions being added and their release schedules.

In that light, we’d like to give you the tools to keep on top of developments, including some facts and figures and best practices to adopt.

2016: A Turning Point 

The months of May and June 2016 saw us hit two significant numbers: the 1000th nTLD was released in May and the milestone of 20 million registered nTLD domains was passed at the beginning June (thanks notably to a huge promotion on .xyz). For comparison, this number was only at 11 million in January this year and as of this writing, a little more than 126 million .com domain names have been registered. Of course, .com is by far the most popular gTLD, so here are some additional figures for a few other extensions to help give an idea of the numbers at play:

.net = 16.2 million domains
.cn = 18.6 million domains
.fr
= 2.9 million domains
.ru
= 5.1 million domains
.pe
= 90,000 domains

So, in other words, hitting that 20 million mark means more domains are registered under the entire nTLD program than under .net or .cn alone, both of which figure amongst the most popular TLDs out there. Another indicator of the strength of the new TLDs is the fact that .xyz—the most popular of the nTLDs—now has more registrations (6 million) than either .info (5.6 million), .ru or .fr. That’s the first time either one of the “classic” gTLDs or any of the ccTLDs (country-specific TLDs) have been surpassed by any extension in the nTLD program. That’s a stand-out achievement that ought to be appreciated.

Keeping watch

For now, it’s true, most new TLDs even the popular ones like .xyz are not well-known by the general public and talk of new TLDs remains largely within the confines of domain name professionals while occasionally being the subject of in-jokes on Silicon Valley or other tech-savvy media. But given the rapid and continued growth of the nTLD program, it’s likely that these extensions will be of increasing importance in the near future. We expect developments like the Internet of Things, which will likely bring a large number of previously-unconnected objects into the public namespace, the transition to IPv6, or the inevitable expansion of online services and of course the eventual depletion of desirable .com domains that will go along with all of these trends to raise the profile of nTLDs drastically over the coming months and years.

In years past, in order to protect a trademark, a brand name or the name of a particular product or service online, in the namespace, it was enough just to consider the countries where you would intended to do business when going beyond the classic gTLDs of .com, .net, .org, .info and .biz. But now it’s becoming more and more necessary to also take into account the possible existence, at present or in the future, of a TLD specifically intended for your particular area of business. This is a blessing for your marketing team, but a potential headache for anyone protecting their intellectual property.

While ICANN does have mechanisms in place (UDRP, USR) to protect against illegitimate usage of a domain name that might be associated with your company or trademark. But these procedures are time-consuming, somewhat onerous, and generally only after the fact.

At the beginning of 2015, it was reported that the number of UDRP complaints for domains in the nTLD program were fifteen times greater than the number of complaints for domains in the “classic” gTLDs. This tends to support the conclusion that cybersquatting on new gTLDs is rampant and encroachment on intellectual property is a serious concern.

Not to disparage any one group over another, these encroachments tend to originate, geographically-speaking, from China: sedo.com, one of the primary marketplaces for domain name resale, estimates that 54% of new registrations are by Chinese citizens. Of course, China has a large population, many of whom are enthusiastic supporters of new technology, but nonetheless cybersquatting looms large among many of these new registrations.

The best protection is defensive registration, that is, registering a domain relevant to your business before a cybersquatter does.

That’s why we suggest regularly checking our site for updates to keep up to date on new releases that might prove essential to your business.

Big brands lead the way

Many of you have probably seen that Canon recently began redirecting their corporate domain name canon.com to the domain name global.canon. This is also a significant turning point for the new TLD program, especially for brand TLDs (also called .brand domains). What’s interesting there is the logic behind Canon’s decision to launch it’s own TLD. On its site in its announcement, Canon explains its decision largely in terms of trust:

"Since “.canon” is a domain name that can only be used by the Canon Group, users of “.canon” sites can be assured that the information they are receiving is reliable. In order to ensure that customers can safely access Canon information beyond the global site, the Company also plans to extend the “.CANON” domain name to other Canon Group sites. (http://global.canon/en/about/dotcanon/)".

Another notable example is the .leclerc TLD, which has been used by the French retailer E.LeClerc when they launched their new car rental service at location.leclerc. This extension is also interesting because the brand name, E.Leclerc itself contains a dot, so now that it has exclusive rights to .leclerc it is free to use e.leclerc as its primary website address.

Other notable organizations to make use of .brand domains include Barclay’s (home.barclays), BNP Paribas (mabanque.bnpparibas) and even the CERN laboratory (home.cern). While getting a whole TLD to oneself is generally not feasible for smaller businesses (an application for a new TLD usually runs about $15,000), as .brand TLDs continue to pop up, other new gTLDs will begin to share in some of the limelight.

And some prominent brands are already opting to register domains in new gTLDs outside of .brands. Here are a few notable examples:

  • abc.xyz (Registered by Google’s parent company: Alphabet). Google’s registration of this domain alone may in fact be one of the main drivers of .xyz’s popularity.
  • ebay.car
  • london.film
  • ism.golf
  • elle.men
  • parliament.scot
  • fcbarcelona.soccer
  • audacity.space
  • valenciaopen.tennis

Many companies use domains registered under a new extension to redirect traffic to their main site, a bit like a shortcut. For example, carlsberg.beer, web.foundation, oxfam.go or disney.tickets.

E-commerce sites also often use new TLDs as a link to a predefined search. Take, for example, Amazon’s registration of the domain book.horse (possible horse_ebooks reference?) which redirects to the results page of an Amazon search for books about horses. The domain video.support redirects to an Amazon search on home theater systems, deal.tires redirects to the search results for tires, and amazon.video to Amazon’s video streaming service.

A second round in the works

The question of a second round of new gTLD applications has been in the air since the first round finished (even a bit before, really). This second round is likely to attract a lot more .brand seekers (though the price is likely to be prohibitive, as mentioned above).

And while rumors have long run rampant (this is the internet after all), ICANN hasn’t indicated any potential date yet, but it’s all but certain that nothing will happen until at least 2018 at the very earliest.

Some large brands have already started to show their interest in a second round, notably Twitter (both for a potential .twitter TLD as well as to get in the registry game as well), often with the security as a primary justification. Stephen Coates, Associate director of Trademarks, Domain names and marketing at twitter, has made clear that he believes in the need for improvements to ensure greater rights protection and that the next round should also make a greater distinction between generic TLDs and brand TLDs.

Meanwhile, over the past few months, ICANN has been studying the first round of nTLDs to help identify some of the shortcomings and improve the mechanism for the second round. The two main points they’re looking at are the effect of new extensions on consumers in terms of choices and competition and the mechanisms of rights management. Some of the points ICANN has been looking into is whether to standardize the Sunrise phase to 60 days, reforming the TMCH (trademark clearinghouse), pricing guidelines and possible restrictions for Premium domains, and the option for registries to arbitrarily reserve domains when the TLD is launched in order to put them on the market at a later point.

Essentially, they’re looking into all the various non-standardized aspects of rolling out a new TLD. Every actor in the market, whether registrars, trademark owners, registries or resellers have a stake in avoiding some of the stickier problems that came up in the first round of releases, especially when it comes to protecting intellectual property and preventing abuse.

Finally, it’s foreseeable that the control mechanisms, such as the DPML put in place by Donuts, will be required across the board. These controls seem to have been highly successful with rights owners and many are lobbying ICANN to enlarge these types of mechanisms and possibly mandate them in the future.

Whatever the outcome may be, if you need help navigating your way through registering a domain under a new gTLD—including when it comes to strategizing to protect your intellectual property rights—please do not hesitate to contact Gandi Corporate. We would be more than happy to be your guides.


We live in a time when an ever-growing proportion of the population carries devices around in its collective pockets capable of capturing and transmitting audio and visual information with a stunning degree of clarity with few barriers to access.

This opens the world to the minutiae of our mundane lives, interesting thoughts or information, and even footage that is shocking or documents events of interest that may not make it through the editorial filters of the mainstream media, for better or for worse.

Protests in Tahrir Square were live-streamed, innumerable political rallies this campaign season were too and so was the sit-in by House Democrats for gun control this month. It’s clear, though, that the power of streaming is not yet fully realized.

So given the raw, untapped power of streaming, it’s exciting news that .stream will enter the GoLive phase on June 28, 2016 at 5:00 PM PDT. The normal price per year at A rates for .stream domains will be $38.31 but from now until December 31, 2016 you can register a .stream domain (or pre-register before it enters GoLive) for just $2.00 per year.

What will you .stream?

.stream


WordPress is the most popular content management system in the world. Free to copy and free from charge, easy to install and to use, it continues to grow in popularity and spread the good word about open source software since 2003. Today, it’s estimated that 30% of all websites use WordPress.

With a PHP/MySQL instance, Gandi users have long been able to quickly install and run WordPress for themselves but we recently asked ourselves how we could make this process even simpler.

It couldn’t be simpler than our answer: one-click installation on the new PHP 5.6 and PHP 7 instances with MySQL 5.6 (Percona), and PHP 5.6 with MySQL 5.5.

Here’s how it works. First, navigate to your instance’s control panel and access the WordPress installation feature. You can install WordPress on any of your vhosts (that is, the web addresses listed on that page). You don’t have to worry about creating a database anymore: it will be automatically created during the installation process. You’ll just have to enter the username, password and email address for your WordPress site’s admin account.

Why tell you, though, when we can show you?

Check it out on our YouTube channel:

You can install as many WordPress sites on an instance as you want or redirect additional domain names to an already existing WordPress site; you just need to return to the admin page to add a new Website to your instance.

The only limitation is, of course, the resources allotted to your instance based on its size, which you can modify as needed.

One of our favorite things about WordPress is that it’s a great tool for those who may not already be crack coders who nonetheless want a truly customized blog. So we’re happy to help facilitate newcomers who may be intimidated by the manual installation process.

WordPress is also robust enough to be preferred by a large swath of the professional development community as well who find the manual process tedious. This allows such users to save time.

If you want more information on the automatic installation process or if you’re curious to know how the manual process works, check out our WordPress tutorial, available in our wiki.

We try to make sure when we roll out a new feature that everything works correctly and smoothly, but of course, we’re not immune to bugs. So if you see something, say something, and we’ll fix it. Or if you have any additional feedback on how to make things easier or how to improve this feature, feel free to send us an email with your thoughts and impressions to feedback@gandi.net.

And of course if you run into any difficulties you can also contact our Customer care team for help.

We’re excited and proud for this new feature to roll out but by no means is this the last WordPress-related improvement we have in store. Stay tuned for more …


This one goes out to all you companies out there.

We see you, sweating and working over there in that office park. Or downtown business district. We see you making value, paying employees, providing services, pleasing customers.

And now we’ve got something for you. On June 22, 2016 at 9:00 AM PDT two new gTLDs that are for those companies out there, working hard for the stakeholders—.ltd and .gmbh—are entering the GoLive phase.

That means domains in these two TLDs are now open to everyone. For .ltd, which now will be available for $25.24 per year at A rates, that means everyone-everyone. For .gmbh, which will now be available for $38.65 per year at A rates, you have to have your existence as a Gesellschaft mit besechränkter Haftung (if you don’t know what that means, sorry .gmbh is not for you) validated with the respective authorities in Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein or Switzerland.

Either way, companies, we know you never take a break, but now you're getting one with .ltd and .gmbh.

This one goes out to you.

Register a domain under one of these TLDs?:

.tld

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