Back in the Dark Ages, before computers and smart phones, you used to have to carry your paper coupons, meticulously clipped from the Sunday paper in a big coupon wallet. Then when you did your shopping, it would be only the stuff on sale: this month turkey, tortilla chips, mint ice cream, tapioca pudding and bagels. And then you’d have to pay with paper money and carry it in paper bags. So much paper. So many trees.

We live in a more technologically advanced age, where you can ride-share to the grocery store or order online for delivery, e-wallets are replacing wallets, cryptocurrency is replacing paper currency, and now, with .promo entering the GoLive phase, that coupon book can go away too.

As of Monday May 23, .promo is now available in the GoLive phase for $19.40 per year at A rates.

Register a .promo?

.promo



South Korea is the world leader in Internet connectivity with an average connection speed of 26.7 Mb/s (as of Q4 2015) with an average peak connection speed of 86.6 Mb/s. 92.4% of South Korea’s population are Internet users.

And now comes another landmark in South Korea’s quest to lead the world as the most connected country on Earth. The Korean equivalents of .com and .net are now entering the Sunrise phase!

.닷컴 (“.com” or .xn--mk1bu44c in punycode) and .닷넷 (“.net” or .xn--t60b56a in punycode) will be available at Gandi in the Sunrise phase starting May 17, 2016 at midnight UTC. Sunrise will last until June 20 and during this time, domains in these extensions will be available for $208.61.

Then at 0:00 UTC on June 21, 2016, a special Godfathering phase will begin. If you are an owner of a .com or a .net domain, this is an offer you can’t refuse. If you are already an owner of a .com or a .net domain, you can purchase the Korean equivalent—.닷컴 if you have a .com, .닷넷 if you have a .net—for $15.54 per year. This will correspond to the Landrush phase for these two TLDS and you should select Landrush when purchasing in the Godfathering phase.

Finally, on August 31, 2016 at 0:00 UTC, GoLive will begin on .닷컴 and .닷넷. They will be available for $15.54 per year each.

Register a domain in one of these TLDs?

.tld

Gandi is proud to present .vip this Tuesday May 17. Tickets are $19.50 each (i.e. per year). You don’t have to be on any list, you don’t have to even be all that important. Doors open at 9:00 AM PDT for this all ages event. It could be a full house, so get in line now.

 Are you a .vip?

.vip


Lines are great. On a map, they draw the boundary between two cities, two states, or two countries. At the store or a concert or the bank, it’s how we wait. You can line up, you can be out of line, over the line, or in line and you can of course also be .online.

From May 15 through May 30, 2016, .online is available for just $4.99.  Normally .online domains are $29.99 at A rates. That’s six for the price of one.

So get in line and get .online while you still can.

Shop .online?

.online

 


Interesting things happen when you’re live. People go off-script, improvise, say and do unexpected things or just feel more spontaneous and direct. Sports is more exciting live. Comedy in front of a live studio audience is funnier. Live news is more breaking and live politics is more raw. Live music is more powerful.

That’s why it’s great that from April 1 until June 30, 2016, .live is on sale for $15.57 per year (normally $31.15 at A rates).

A .live domain also goes well with .rocks and .social, which are two other TLDs on sale since January. That was supposed to end March 31, but that’s now been extended to June 30.

Register a domain under one of these TLDs?:

.tld

Greetings, intrepid domain name adventurer! This month in our ongoing infographic series we travel through time and space to a land of magic and mystery, in which previously only the brave have dared venture.

We are here to guide you on your quest through the unforgiving territory between registrars: the no man’s land of domain name transfers.

Before we begin, remember, in this land, the registry is king. The route we’ve mapped is valid in most kingdoms, that is, most generic TLDs (.com, .net, etc.).

However, the laws of the land can vary, depending on the registry.

The journey between the losing registrar and the gaining registrar has four verifications

As in any quest, it’s foolhardy to leave your home castle without being properly prepared for the road ahead. For us, that means unlocking your domain by removing the transfer protection status, and obtaining the authorization code (the Auth code) from your registrar.

Get your domain unlocked from the losing registrar and ask for your authorization code

Once you have properly prepared, launch your volley to the gaining registrar. If that’s Gandi, that means placing the order to transfer your domain.

Next, you will face four challenges, represented here by four towers along the road to transfer.

First is the Auth code verification challenge. If your key, which you obtained from your losing registrar, matches the one from the registry, you may proceed. If not, you are thrown in the dungeon. Well, not really, you just won’t be able to transfer your domain.

Next, you come to a moat which can only be crossed if the drawbridge is lowered. To lower the drawbridge, your domain must be “unlocked.

In other words, it must not have either a clientTransferProhibited or serverTransferProhibited status. Otherwise, you will be fed to the moat monsters. And by that we mean you’ll get an error message.

The gaining registrar checks the authorization code and the domain status

The next tower you come to is home to two little birdies. These carry messages to the registrant email address listed in the whois (either the Owner address or the Admin address provided by your previous registrar) and to the email address provided to your new registrar.

Only when the transfer is confirmed by following the link in both emails (that is, only when both birds fly home) can you proceed. Otherwise, in the words of a great meme wizard: “You. Shall. Not. Pass!”

Emails to the address in the whois and the one provided must be confirmed

At last, at the final tower, a flag is raised notifying the losing registrar of the transfer. This comes in the form of a message sent by the registry. This is the last chance the losing registrar has to prevent the transfer, which they can and should do if appropriate. Generally, this would be in cases of fraud, theft, etc.

A positive confirmation from the registrar allows you to proceed on your quest immediately. Otherwise, if no word comes from the previous registrar within five days, you may also proceed.

If the losing registrar accepts or if five days pass the transfer goes through

After that, congratulations! You’ve made it! Your domain is transferred.

A few other notes: you may want to prepare things at your new registrar a bit before launching the transfer. This includes configuring your DNS settings and even setting up email, hosting, etc.

Also, we would be remiss not to mention, that however arduous the journey, you are never alone when seeking to transfer your domain. If your quest seems too daunting and too dangerous, our Customer Care knights are available for guidance along the way and/or dragon slaying (when applicable). You can reach them using our online contact form.

Finally, for detailed instructions, our sage scribes have compiled a complete guide to domain name transfers in our wiki.


The amazing explosion in modern computing, networking, and cryptography in the past eighty some years all grew out of collaborations between the miltary, academia, and ocassionally business contractors. As the three fields blossomed into new technology that would change the way humanity connects, it created friction between those in the military establishment who wanted to limit these fields to the security interests they represent and those who saw the potential for such technical advances to be used for lofty goals like human rights.

When Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman published “New Directions in Cryptography” in 1976, they noted in the introduction that computer communication would soon be connecting people around the world and that communication between individuals—not militaries or financial institutions—would need to be made secure.

This was their preamble to their solution to the age-old cryptographic riddle of secure distribution of ciphers. The system they went on to describe enables two people who have never met face-to-face to communicate with one another without third-parties listening.

They proposed using mathematical functions to create pairs of keys: one public, one private. A publicly visible key would be used to encrypt a message that only a privately-held key could decrypt.

Diffie and Hellman solved the problem of key exchange, but they left open the problem of implementing it using a one-way function.

This problem intrigued three researchers at MIT: Ron Rivest, Adi Shamir and Leonard Adleman.

They spent nearly a year trying to find a solution. Then, in April 1977, the trio spent Passover together, drinking wine and talking. That night Rivest developed a bad case of insomnia.

So he spent the night formalizing what would became the RSA algorithm, named for Rivest, Shamir and Adleman. After the trio verified and refined the system they’d invented, they published it in August 1977 and filed a patent through MIT in December.

Their patent became the basis of RSA Security, the company founded in 1982 by Rivest, Shamir and Adleman to market implementations of their RSA algorithm.

These developments, though, were not exactly welcomed by the military establishment. Cryptographic tools have long figured on the U.S. Munitions List and as early as July 1977, the NSA started signaling that they felt threatened by private developments in cryptography like public-key encryption and RSA.

Meanwhile, the 1980s brought computers and networking out of government and university laboratories and into homes and offices.

A bill in the House of Representatives which would have restricted public use of cryptography prompted Phil Zimmerman, an anti-nuclear protestor in Colorado, to start what he would later call a “human rights project,”: to apply public-key encryption to email communication.

Zimmerman thought the RSA algorithm was just be used for what he called “petri dish cryptography.” So he “borrowed” it to create a scrambling function he named Bass-O-Matic after an SNL skit.

Then in June 1991 he released “Pretty Good Privacy” or PGP version 1 which used the Bass-O-Matic function to encrypt emails.

In the documentation, Zimmerman wrote: “it would be nice if everyone routinely used encryption for all their e-mail, innocent or not, so that no one drew suspicion by asserting their e-mail privacy with encryption,” describing encryption as a “form of solidarity.”

Mere hours after posting it online, PGP went global.

Soon its distribution on the Internet got Zimmerman into trouble, both with US Customs and with RSA Security.

In the first case, because PGP was distributed outside of the US, posting PGP online made Zimmerman guilty of arms trafficking.

His solution to the first problem was unique: print the PGP source code in a hardcopy book through MIT Press, then sell and distribute it with First Amendment protection.

People who wanted a copy of PGP could buy the book, take out the pages and scan them in (or type it by hand).

It wasn’t until later that US courts would extend first amendment protection to all software source code but the US Customs case was eventually dropped.

In the second case, Zimmerman’s use of RSA violated RSA’s patent protection.

This proved harder to beat. PGP 3 abandoned RSA for the unpatented DSA and ElGamal algorithms.

The new PGP Inc. then merged with Viacrypt, who had an RSA license, but patent issues plagued PGP through multiple acquisitions.

In the meantime, another technology was being developed by Netscape using RSA.

Netscape’s case was a different problem than email encryption.

PGP is an application level solution. Netscape needed to provide Transport (or Socket) layer security. The solution that Netscape engineers developed was called Secure Socket Layer or SSL.

Version 1, never made it outside of Netscape. Version 2 was released in 1995 but due to serious security flaws, Netscape began working on version 3.

Netscape engineers Phil Karlton and Alan Freier worked with cryptographer Paul Kocher. While Kocher was a biology major at Stanford, he worked part-time with none other than Martin Hellman. The three soon released SSL version 3.

In 1997, Zimmerman took PGP to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) to propose an OpenPGP standard.

Today, the patent on the RSA algorithm has been released and OpenPGP is an official internet standard.

The SSL protocol proposed as an Internet Standard in 1999 and renamed TLS.

Diffie and Hellman’s predictions about the future of networking played out and their revolutionary discovery inspired RSA. The raw potential of this discovery was enough to make the military powers-that-be nervous.

Yet, Phil Zimmerman’s desire to encrypt all email “in solidarity” still hasn’t come about. TLS-level security far outstrips email encryption in terms of adoption but TLS/SSL is far from universal.

Public key encryption continues to be an invaluable human rights tool. The battle between encryption-for-all and the more narrow interests of law enforcement and the military continue to make headlines. Encryption is far from universal and the conflict is far from resolved.


.ist this it? Yes! Today, May 10, 2016 is the day .ist AND .istanbul enter the GoLive phase.

Pre-orders in this phase are being submitted and now, you can get any .ist or .istanbul domain still available for just $23.33 per year at A rates for .ist and $29.07 per year for .istanbul.

Both of these extensions are for the great and ancient city of Istanbul, but are open to anyone.

This .ist (and .istanbul) what you’ve always wanted, .istn't it?

Register a domain under one of these TLDs?:

.tld

You may be aware that we recently celebrated a day of some significance to Mexican history. Of course, we’re talking about Cinco de Mayo, the birthday of the last Mexican governor of California, Pío Pico, born May 5, 1801.*

If only Pío Pico had also been in some way instrumental in the post office, then we would have a perfect deal for him: all the rest of this month from May 9 through May 31, 2016, .mx domains the official TLD of Mexico (but also the technical abbreviation for “mailbox”) will be available for half-price. That’s $24.00 per year instead of the usual $48.00 per year at A rates.

Register a .mx?

.mx

 

* What's all this about the Battle of Puebla?


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